Draft Prospect Profile: Martin Kaut

  

Each day over the next month leading up to the 2018 NHL Entry Draft, held on June 22 in Dallas, we will be taking a look at the top 31 prospects available, starting with the 31st and leading up to number one.

Next in the series of prospect profiles is our 19th-ranked prospect, right wing Martin Kaut.

Martin Kaut
2017–18 Team: Pardubice (Czech Republic)
Date of Birth: October 2, 1999
Place of Birth: Brno, Czech Republic
Height: 6’2”
Weight: 176 lbs
Shoots: Right
Position: RW

NHL Central Scouting Final Ranking: 4 (European Skaters)
NHL Central Scouting Midterm Ranking: 11 (European Skaters)

NHL Comparable: Marian Hossa

Coming into the season, Martin Kaut was not expected to be high draft pick, instead being projected as a mid-round selection. However, thanks in large part to a very strong showing at the World Junior Championships, Kaut’s draft stock skyrocketed.

Kaut has played a depth role for his team in the Czech league, meaning his offensive totals did not jump off the page, tallying nine goals and seven assists this season. However, given the opportunity to play on the first line at the World Juniors with former first rounder Martin Necas and top prospect Filip Zadina, Kaut displayed his high-end offensive abilities, posting two goals and five assists in seven games.

While he does not have amazing acceleration, Kaut does possess good speed. He has strong legs, giving Kaut a powerful stride and very good balance, which he uses well to protect the puck and stay upright when challenged physically. If Kaut can improve his acceleration, he should be able to win more loose pucks and be able to create better separation from opponents.

Kaut has a pretty good shot, specifically his wrist shot. He has pinpoint accuracy and has a good amount of power despite not being a big player. He has a very quick release, which can fool goaltenders and allow him to sneak by shots when a goalie is not prepared for a shot. Kaut has good hands, which he can use to finish plays close to the net in the form of deflections, rebounds and net-front dekes. Kaut also has a good snapshot and a decent slapshot.

Perhaps the aspect most impressive about his performance at the World Juniors was Kaut’s passing ability. Kaut has a keen sense for setting up his teammates at the right time in the right place. Kaut put the puck on a platter for Necas and Zadina on multiple occasions, making a goal look easy. Kaut excels in the cycle game and enjoys being a setup man on the power play, where he can display his dazzling playmaking ability thanks to his excellent vision and recognition.

Kaut is a very sound two-way player, as he has excelled in a defensive role for his team in the Czech Republic. He has very good positioning and is good at breaking up passes because of his awareness. Kaut is willing to block shots. The one area of his defensive game that could be improved is his ability to win board battles, which could be addressed by getting stronger.

Implications for the Blackhawks
Kaut is an intriguing prospect because of the glimpses shown of what he can do. It is entirely possible a team likes him enough to take him in the middle of the first round. He is not good enough to crack the top 10, so the Hawks will certainly not reach for him at eight. But, he could be available at 27 if teams are unsure of his offensive consistency. He could be a nice addition that head coach Joel Quenneville would likely enjoy having thanks to his sound defensive game and ability to produce offense. He has drawn comparisons to Marian Hossa, which Blackhawk fans can appreciate, though do not expect him to have as prolific a career as Hossa.

Timeline
Kaut needs to bulk up and work on his acceleration, which will likely take at least a year to do so. Do not expect him in North America until 2019–20.

Projection
Kaut is a bit of a question mark because it remains to be seen what type of a player he will really be. He has shown glimpses of excellence, but has not done that over an extended period of time, which could simply be because of a lack of opportunity to do so with his Czech league team. If he is able to play a high-end offensive game consistently, he could develop into a top-line winger. In reality, he would likely be a better second or third line winger with the ability to play an effective two-way game.

What others are saying
One thing I love about the WJC is being able to see a teenage player with a checking role on an adult team play top-line minutes against his peers. Kaut, an energy player for Pardubice, had an outstanding world juniors debut by picking up three assists — all primary — while playing the wing with Zadina and Necas. All three of his passes were right on the tape or in a perfect spot to unload from, as the tallies from both Necas and Kral were one-timers off dishes from Kaut, who was the 24th pick in the 2017 CHL Import Draft but chose to stay with Pardubice for another season. Keep in mind, Kaut isn’t just some sort of flashy playmaker — he’s a highly-responsible 200-foot player who plays in all situations.”
Steve Kournianos/The Draft Analyst

“With so many players trying to make a name for themselves, it can be anywhere from difficult to almost impossible to stand out in a crowd, especially after a disappointing start to a season. That’s where Czech winger Martin Kaut found himself after a poor showing at the Five Nations tournament. That didn’t stop Kaut from making the World Junior Championship a personal showcase of how talented he is. He finished the tournament with seven points in seven games. He played on a line with Martin Necas and Filip Zadina and looked comfortable playing the playmaking role. Whether he was distributing the puck with precision, as evidenced by his three primary assist game, or burying his chances, Kaut was one of the best players of the entire tournament. How much attention has Kaut received since? He beat out his fellow countryman Zadina for a spot on the World (Championship) roster for the Czech Republic. This says something about Kaut and the kind of player he is.”
Mark Scheig/The Hockey Writers

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Center Ice Forums Draft Prospect Profile: Martin Kaut

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  • #7328
    Eric Andrews
    Moderator

    Each day over the next month leading up to the 2018 NHL Entry Draft, held on June 22 in Dallas, we will be taking a look at the top 31 prospects avail
    [To continue reading full article, click here: Draft Prospect Profile: Martin Kaut]

    #7330
    Under Qs moustache
    Participant

    The Hawks are in a very good position in this draft, the top talent Dahlin, Svchnikov, Tkachuk, and Zadina will all be gone. The next 10 to 15 picks are all projects of some sort, size, skating, scoring, adapting to smaller rink in North America, where does their game translate to the NHL and discipline are all the question marks of the second tier. The Hawks could trade down and get a similar player plus a pick if their guy goes before #8, and I wouldn’t count this out of the offer is good enough. With no second rounder, thanks to the abhorrent trade with Montreal for Dannault (a player the Hawks could really use right now), picking up a second or an additional 3rd rounder could help rebuild this team in a few years, or supply the player needed for a trade. The number 8 pick may be a few years away especially if they choose a defenseman. So the 8th pick is more about future than next year, as is most of the rest of the draft. However, I do like this Walstrom kid, and with a little luck he could be a Saad like right wing(6’1″ 205lbs.) and could be NHL ready by mid season as there isn’t much NHL talent infront of him on the Hawks roster right now.

    #7335

    The Hawks are in a very good position in this draft, the top talent Dahlin, Svchnikov, Tkachuk, and Zadina will all be gone. The number 8 pick may be a few years away especially if they choose a defenseman. So the 8th pick is more about future than next year, as is most of the rest of the draft. However, I do like this Walstrom kid, and with a little luck he could be a Saad like right wing(6’1″ 205lbs.) and could be NHL ready by mid season as there isn’t much NHL talent infront of him on the Hawks roster right now.

    I just want to say, the only thing set in stone is that Dahlin goes first overall.

    Just because a dozen Drafting loudmouths (myself included) have presents you with bunch of lists that  all I all look fairly similar in the top ten, that DOESN’T MEAN that is THE WAY this DRAFT GOES.

    I have already heard that Montreal in their quest to fill a long term need at centre might select Jesperi
    Kotkaniemi. And I don’t mean by a trade down because there’s interest in more than one club as he has emerged as the best big centre prospect in a class  that has no other possible first line centres.

    Furthermore both Evan Bouchard and Noah Dobson are looking like guys off the board quicker than most expected after they made their lists. Bouchard is understandable because he is close, but Dobson is far from close and far from “head quick” to be considered a sure-fire solution, just a potential solution…yet teams are interested in lower slots.

    This entire defenseman class has garnished SO much interest, I will go on the line now, and tell you I could see Zadina,and Tkachuk lasting a bit longer than expected…or not.

    And Svechnikov, well he won’t be there for the Blackhawks but what we can hope is that there is slippage at the forward position that aids the Blackhawks.

    If I had a wish list of droppers, I would put Zadina, Tkachuk and Hughes in that order on my list.

    I think there is a good chance Walstrom will drop…He isn’t the fast, dynamic skater and sure he has got a cannon, but he simply isn’t intense, consistent in his interest in getting pucks back and working the wall…more of a perimeter player who WILL get in dirty areas when he has a chance too score but not to work…the consensus is he is a top six guy with upside, but you prepare for a downgrade to top nine forward by HAVING a strong defensive commitment and be a better defensive player…so Saad comparison doesn’t work on BOTH ends…OW>BS as an attacker/scorer, BS>OW as a big man who can handle “involvement.”

    Just my two cents…

    and Danault is not special and the Playoff trade was a horrible one but he isn’t gonna be a top six guy for any team but on lacking forwards like the Habs…

    #7336

    And here is my take on Kaut, he is sort good in all areas but not great.

    Right now on my board, he goes first in the second round:

     

    High-end skater with top end speed, separation, and skills. Uses his elite puck handling and stick skills to blow out of his defensive zone, and will back up the defenders when he quickly gets to attacking zone blueline. Lethal shooter who can target the corners, jump on the rebounds and even deflect shots from the point. Has a deceptive way of stickhandling and diguising whenhe going to release his shots, and will use defenders as screens in the process. Very imaginative in his strategies and passes. There is much to like, but seems a bit disinterested in his own end and when his team gets behind or out-matched.

    –Bill Placzek–

    #7339

    In my profile of Wahlstrom, I said that IF there was a possibility he could be turned into a cent reman, then his value would go up. He hasn’t played there in a Long while, and there was no need with next year’s 1st overall Hughes centering him this season, but he is better he doesn’t have to get in the dirty areas along the walls.

    #7342

    The Hawks could trade down and get a similar player plus a pick if their guy goes before #8,

    The fatal flaw in this idea is that their is one guy at slot 8.

    In my  humble opinion, they get a fine prospect at 8.

    And after the top dozen, there starts to be a whole lot more risk over reward, and the there is less chance of getting a top end prospect who even if he doesn’t work up to the first line first pair lofty expectations, the guys you get in the top ten WILL play.

    It isn’t like the old days when you saw SO MANY flat lines, as kids didn’t progress. Nowadays they have many parts down, have advisors and are in conditioning programs. Sure, a guy taken in the mid first may be the guy who emerges as best player in the crop, but that is more about the nature of drafting 18 year olds and some just seem to blossom towards their highest levels of promise in those later developmental years. What you DO know about the top ten is they skate pretty darn well, they think fast at the junior level which translates to thinking faster when they do arrive at the quick think/react NHL, and the scorers need refining not developing.

     

     

    #7343

    The Hawks could trade down and get a similar player plus a pick if their guy goes before #8,

    The fatal flaw in this idea is that there is one guy at slot 8. They know who on their short list will and they arranged best player available.

    When they wanted Tom Wilson, and took Teuvo, they only pouted after Wilson was taken and then moved to Teravainen; when Habs took Ryan Poehling, they promptly traded out and further up because they figured no one else had Henri Jokiharju ranked that high, because he needed LOTS more development, so don’t believe the hype about him walking in and winning a job just yet. (and if Jokiharju WAS taken there was still three nice forward options in Eeli Tolvanen, Kole Lind and big Klim Kostin.

    In my  humble opinion, they get a fine prospect at 8.

    And after the top dozen, there starts to be a whole lot more risk over reward, and the there is less chance of getting a top end prospect who even if he doesn’t work up to the first line first pair lofty expectations, the guys you get in the top ten WILL play.

    It isn’t like the old days when you saw SO MANY flat lines, as kids didn’t progress. Nowadays they have many parts down, have advisors and are in conditioning programs. Sure, a guy taken in the mid first may be the guy who emerges as best player in the crop, but that is more about the nature of drafting 18 year olds and some just seem to blossom towards their highest levels of promise in those later developmental years. What you DO know about the top ten is they skate pretty darn well, they think fast at the junior level which translates to thinking faster when they do arrive at the quick think/react NHL, and the scorers need refining not developing.

     

     

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